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  #1  
Old 11-25-2015, 04:30 PM
KateD KateD is offline
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Default Not vintage, but decided to try this...

I've conducted several hunts around this area to find vintage cast iron, and the best I could do so far was a #10 Lodge skillet from - I'm guessing... around 2006-2008. Whoa - wake the kids, call the neighbors!

Since collectors seem to agree that the major difference between the great old stuff and the new stuff is the cooking surface - is it smooth or pebbly - I figured the next best thing to do, if I want a pan with a smooth surface on the inside, is to take a new piece and modify it.

This is the second new piece that I've ground and polished on the inside - it's a Lodge chef pan I found for $14.



I posted it on my Facebook timeline, and it has generated more comments than anything I've ever posted. I didn't realize I had so many cast iron fans in my friends list.
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  #2  
Old 11-25-2015, 04:36 PM
DSBradley DSBradley is offline
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Default Re: Not vintage, but decided to try this...

Nicely done Kate. That cooking surface looks like any of the old iron.
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  #3  
Old 11-25-2015, 05:23 PM
W. Hilditch W. Hilditch is offline
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Default Re: Not vintage, but decided to try this...

Kate, I've sanded a couple of Lodges myself and I looked like a coal miner at the end of a shift, but got them smooth. I can only see maybe one pit in your pic, but did you discover quite a few little pits by the time you were finished like I did?

Hilditch
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  #4  
Old 11-25-2015, 06:31 PM
KevM KevM is offline
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Default Re: Not vintage, but decided to try this...

nicely done. things taste better out of an older pan. kinda like using gold medal flower for biscuits instead of white lily, it just doesnt taste the same.
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  #5  
Old 11-25-2015, 06:47 PM
Mark H Mark H is offline
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Default Re: Not vintage, but decided to try this...

It will taste good out of that skillet. Very nice to see.
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  #6  
Old 11-25-2015, 08:14 PM
KateD KateD is offline
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Default Re: Not vintage, but decided to try this...

Quote:
Originally Posted by W. Hilditch View Post
Kate, I've sanded a couple of Lodges myself and I looked like a coal miner at the end of a shift, but got them smooth. I can only see maybe one pit in your pic, but did you discover quite a few little pits by the time you were finished like I did?

Hilditch
Haha - coal miner is right! It's a pretty dirty job, for sure. Dust mask and safety goggles are a must to do this.

Yes, there is one pit left close to the middle of the pan, and two or three closer to the edges that you can barely see at all. I was afraid if I kept going on them, I'd end up changing the shape of the pan, and have to grind off another 128th of an inch all over the inside to maintain the original contour. But I've at least smoothed them out enough that, once the seasoning gets more built-up, they will become invisible.

[SIZE=1]---------- Post added at 07:02 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:58 PM ----------[/SIZE]

Quote:
Originally Posted by KevM View Post
things taste better out of an older pan. kinda like using gold medal flower for biscuits instead of white lily, it just doesnt taste the same.
Things do taste better in old cast iron. I have a 1977 Wagner Ware pan that I bought new - not one of the rock stars of cast iron, but it's well-aged, and I know exactly what you're talking about.

[SIZE=1]---------- Post added at 07:14 PM ---------- Previous post was at 07:02 PM ----------[/SIZE]

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark H View Post
It will taste good out of that skillet.
It's a very nice pan, even now. Helps to know how to cook, of course, but I think it's going to be really special someday.
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  #7  
Old 11-25-2015, 10:44 PM
W. Hilditch W. Hilditch is offline
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Default Re: Not vintage, but decided to try this...

If you ground those pits out others would appear as something crystalizes in Lodge iron. When you build up some good seasoning I suspect you will like the food out of this skillet as good as the Wagner. Maybe even better than the older ones.

Hilditch
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  #8  
Old 11-26-2015, 12:09 AM
Dan Farmer Dan Farmer is offline
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Default Re: Not vintage, but decided to try this...

Quote:
Originally Posted by W. Hilditch View Post
If you ground those pits out others would appear as something crystalizes in Lodge iron. When you build up some good seasoning I suspect you will like the food out of this skillet as good as the Wagner. Maybe even better than the older ones.

Hilditch
I really don't care what you think, but for the sake of newbies that are coming here for good information, there is NO flavoring that comes from polymerized oil, Hilditch. Polymerized oil (aka "seasoning" is the nonstick finish that we're looking for, but it adds or subtracts nothing from the taste. Any special taste that it may offer would come from the Maillard reaction resulting from the browning that has stuck to the food rather than to the pan. Let's keep facts and imagination separate.
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  #9  
Old 11-26-2015, 12:13 AM
W. Hilditch W. Hilditch is offline
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Default Re: Not vintage, but decided to try this...

Did I mention flavoring?

Hilditch
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  #10  
Old 11-26-2015, 03:50 PM
KateD KateD is offline
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Default Re: Not vintage, but decided to try this...

Quote:
Originally Posted by W. Hilditch View Post
If you ground those pits out others would appear as something crystalizes in Lodge iron.
I really hadn't noticed any new pits appearing after I'd gotten other ones ground out. The ones that I left there, were all ones that I had been working on for a while.

I wonder if that is more or less likely to happen, depending on what kind of grinding method/abrasives used? Most of the work done on this one was with 40 grit sandpaper and quick-strip wheels.
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