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Cast Iron Cleaning and Seasoning Help With and Tips & Techniques For Cast Iron Cookware Restoration

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  #11  
Old 10-27-2015, 11:20 PM
W. Hilditch W. Hilditch is offline
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Default Re: Seasoning Got Brown

Adam, I feel your frustration. Just isn’t making sense. So I went and looked at my Crisco can. Bingo! The last time I looked at a Crisco can the main ingredient was canola oil. Canola oil has a smoke point of 400°, so if you go over that it will smoke and burn. Just like butter does over 350°.

Well, Crisco changed the game. My present can has the main ingredient listed as soybean oil. Smoke point of 495°.

Under normal circumstances going over 500° is flirting with hurting the seasoning made with smoke points of 350 to 400’ish degrees. However, with just soybean oil it may very well take 525° or 550° to get that oil to burn.

BTW, once a piece comes up to temp. an hour or so should be enough time to burn it in.

Check your can man.

Hilditch
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  #12  
Old 11-04-2015, 06:10 PM
Adam_R. Adam_R. is offline
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Default Re: Seasoning Got Brown

Quote:
Originally Posted by W. Hilditch View Post
Adam, I feel your frustration. Just isn’t making sense. So I went and looked at my Crisco can. Bingo! The last time I looked at a Crisco can the main ingredient was canola oil. Canola oil has a smoke point of 400°, so if you go over that it will smoke and burn. Just like butter does over 350°.

Well, Crisco changed the game. My present can has the main ingredient listed as soybean oil. Smoke point of 495°.

Under normal circumstances going over 500° is flirting with hurting the seasoning made with smoke points of 350 to 400’ish degrees. However, with just soybean oil it may very well take 525° or 550° to get that oil to burn.

BTW, once a piece comes up to temp. an hour or so should be enough time to burn it in.

Check your can man.

Hilditch
So I checked my can, the main ingredient is indeed soybean oil followed by palm oil. I had a chance to try and increase the heat, my ovens highest setting is 525. Left a few in for an hour and they were still brown.

Does anyone else have this problem? 5 of the 7 skillets I've seasoned have come out brown. Time to try another seasoning oil I guess, any crowd favorites besides Crisco?

Last edited by Adam_R.; 11-04-2015 at 06:12 PM. Reason: Adding text.
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  #13  
Old 11-04-2015, 06:50 PM
Ty L. Ty L. is offline
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Default Re: Seasoning Got Brown

Your pans are seasoned. Cook with them, they'll get darker with use.
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  #14  
Old 11-04-2015, 08:02 PM
W. Hilditch W. Hilditch is offline
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Default Re: Seasoning Got Brown

Ty is right, for a lot of reasons. I recently did a SS cookie sheet with canola oil and after 4 rounds in the oven at 475° it is still a dark brown. Historically I have used lard & it always got shiny black on the second round. It worked on the SS but started chipping and letting go. So I cleaned it and am going with the canola. Never had that issue with CI/lard even though I put it on too heavy.

Hilditch
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  #15  
Old 11-04-2015, 11:03 PM
DSBradley DSBradley is offline
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Default Re: Seasoning Got Brown

I want to suggest a couple of thoughts, One, is it possible that Adam seasoned over a flash rust or maybe a pan that got to hot? I would think black with red would result in a brown color. Two, maybe Adam's oven is off and not getting the desired temp to season the pans? I'm most likely wrong on both parts but you never know.
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  #16  
Old 11-04-2015, 11:09 PM
Doug D. Doug D. is offline
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Default Re: Seasoning Got Brown

The brown is not from flash rust, which should have wiped off with the excess oil removed before baking it. The brownish caste is not that unusual. You may not like it, but it's not an error in seasoning procedure. It's just how some pans in some situations turn out. Blackening comes with time and usage, and from cooked food components in the fat, not necessarily just the fat itself, that carbonize and darken.
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  #17  
Old 11-04-2015, 11:10 PM
Dan Farmer Dan Farmer is offline
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Default Re: Seasoning Got Brown

Quote:
Originally Posted by DSBradley View Post
I want to suggest a couple of thoughts, One, is it possible that Adam seasoned over a flash rust or maybe a pan that got to hot? I would think black with red would result in a brown color. Two, maybe Adam's oven is off and not getting the desired temp to season the pans? I'm most likely wrong on both parts but you never know.
That has me thinking... I have a couple of pans that have a red stain... not rust... the iron itself is reddish. I don't know for sure, but I believe that it is caused by overheating. Possibly by somebody that burned old seasoning off. I haven't been able to scrub through it or remove it with vinegar or electrolysis. But even in those cases, the entire piece isn't discolored.
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  #18  
Old 11-04-2015, 11:13 PM
Doug D. Doug D. is offline
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Default Re: Seasoning Got Brown

Fire damage is typically blotchy. Different areas will be hazy white, rosy red, or bluish.
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  #19  
Old 11-04-2015, 11:17 PM
Dan Farmer Dan Farmer is offline
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Default Re: Seasoning Got Brown

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Originally Posted by Doug D. View Post
Fire damage is typically blotchy. Different areas will be hazy white, rosy red, or bluish.
Yes, that's what I'm talking about. Not an overall coloring.
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  #20  
Old 11-05-2015, 07:07 PM
Mark H Mark H is offline
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Default Re: Seasoning Got Brown

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug D. View Post
The brown is not from flash rust, which should have wiped off with the excess oil removed before baking it. The brownish caste is not that unusual. You may not like it, but it's not an error in seasoning procedure. It's just how some pans in some situations turn out. Blackening comes with time and usage, and from cooked food components in the fat, not necessarily just the fat itself, that carbonize and darken.
After about 10 days through cooking and baking has darkened up an Erie for me.
This was following the advice on this site about seasoning. Cook with it and you should get the darker finish shortly.
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