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Cast Iron Cleaning and Seasoning Help With and Tips & Techniques For Cast Iron Cookware Restoration

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  #11  
Old 09-14-2015, 08:53 PM
T.Winchester T.Winchester is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

American history is full of food-borne illnesses: typhoid (Salmonella bacteria) sickened and killed a lot of people. My dad and his brother got typhoid, and they were lucky to have survived. Born in 1876, Dad's mother probably had no idea about sanitation in the kitchen.

I can't imagine picking maggots out of bread, and then eating it. WOW!

Bacon grease: the grease itself, I am not afraid of - after all I use it as seasoning for beans, and such - but it has to be strained of all the crumblings first.

I think my CI has to be introduced to soap and water after cooking.
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  #12  
Old 09-15-2015, 04:33 PM
RLMuse RLMuse is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

Quote:
Originally Posted by J. Fisher View Post
I did not mean poop as in feces- its just an easier way to visualize why you can't make spoiled meat edible just by cooking it. A better word for bacteria poop is toxins. As some bacteria grow they produce toxins than normal cooking temperatures cannot make safe. The most well known being botulism. Pretending this doesn't happen doesn't make it safe.

Also, I'm sure my grandma's butcher sanitized properly. I would not buy meat from someone who didn't. You would?
Sanitizing in the early 1900s basically meant that the upscale butcher would wipe off the cutting surface with a rag with soap and water.

Having seen butcher shops in the 3rd world, it is not hard to imagine that the lack of sanitary procedures was a commonplace occurrence in the U.S. not too long ago.

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  #13  
Old 09-15-2015, 05:35 PM
W. Hilditch W. Hilditch is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

Great pic! A big city butcher shop. I love seeing the sawdust on the floor. I remember seeing it in shops in Ontario - fish and meat. Great for absorbing some juices and any remaining blood. Sweep it back in off the sidewalk and close the door for the night. A new sprinkle on top and good to go the next day. Change it out on Sunday.

Missing from the pic are the chickens, but they are in the back.

OMG a fly landed on the meat!!!!!!!!!!!! BYA I'd buy my meat here.

Hilditch
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  #14  
Old 09-15-2015, 05:58 PM
T.Winchester T.Winchester is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

Quote:
Originally Posted by RLMuse View Post
Sanitizing in the early 1900s basically meant that the upscale butcher would wipe off the cutting surface with a rag with soap and water.

Having seen butcher shops in the 3rd world, it is not hard to imagine that the lack of sanitary procedures was a commonplace occurrence in the U.S. not too long ago.

I hope you're not suggesting that if it was good for them in 1900 it's good for us. Many an illness spread as a result of this type of unsanitary condition. I guess I know now why women insist on rinsing meats before cooking

Really, I guess it's all a man's world on these forums that would suggest not worrying about germs. Few of us do, but when it comes to cooking, and preparing meals for others in the household, I take precautions. Of course, it probably doesn't help that I have a germ OCD diagnosis.

Well, I'm thinking about the Lye bath, and am wondering if the food grade lye is any more safe than the regular. From what I've read through Google searches, its just as deadly.

And how do we know that Vinegar neutralizes the Lye, and that the Lye won't soak into the porous CI?

Serious post.
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  #15  
Old 09-15-2015, 09:52 PM
Bonnie Scott Bonnie Scott is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

It was common practice back then to preserve meat with salt. I imagine all the carcasses hanging there are salted. It worked. It was also one of the reasons people would rinse the meat.
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  #16  
Old 09-15-2015, 10:29 PM
RobM RobM is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

Quote:
Originally Posted by T.Winchester View Post

Well, I'm thinking about the Lye bath, and am wondering if the food grade lye is any more safe than the regular. From what I've read through Google searches, its just as deadly.

And how do we know that Vinegar neutralizes the Lye, and that the Lye won't soak into the porous CI?

Serious post.
Serious answer. Cast iron isn't porous, that's an internet myth.

I don't ever neutralize with vinegar, once scrubbed with stainless wool they are washed in soap and water, rinsed and seasoned...

Ever eat a bagel? They are either dipped in a lye solution or baking soda solution. When I make them, I use lye.
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  #17  
Old 09-15-2015, 11:38 PM
T.Winchester T.Winchester is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

sheesh, cast iron isn't porous? It's one of the most porous of metals, and if it wasn't there'd be no more seasoning on the pan when it gets wiped down, which is why it has to be hot (when the pores are opened) when seasoned, and cooled down so the pores close and retain the seasoning.

I would have thought there'd be a few experts in the industries in this place to help clarify some this stuff, but it seems that it's populated with people with differing opinions, sans credentials.
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  #18  
Old 09-16-2015, 12:00 AM
Doug D. Doug D. is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

It's not porous, at least not in the respect that it has channels like a sponge through which liquid may flow or openings that expand and contract relative to temperature. There may be microscopic irregularities where crystalline graphite, a component of cast iron, may have been removed leaving voids at the surface, but we're talking microns. If it were porous, we wouldn't need to wipe it down, the oil would just soak in.
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  #19  
Old 09-16-2015, 03:10 PM
KevinE KevinE is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

So if I understand this correctly, T. Winchester, your credentials (since you brought them up) for perpetuating the myth that cast iron is porous, not knowing the basic chemistry of acids and bases (i.e., how vinegar neutralizes lye), and that lye is "deadly," is some Google searches and being a certified germaphobe. Is that about right?

As for my "credentials:" B.S. in Science and Mathematics, "A" level licenses in potable water, biological wastewater, physical/chemical wastewater, water distribution, and I recently retired after 32 years in the nuclear power industry as a chemistry supervisor. I have other credentials as well, but those are really the only ones pertinent here. At the end of the day though, my credentials ain't getting me a cup of coffee at Starbucks or anywhere else, for that matter. Point being.........."credentials" don't mean squat.
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  #20  
Old 09-16-2015, 03:29 PM
T.Winchester T.Winchester is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinE View Post
So if I understand this correctly, T. Winchester, your credentials (since you brought them up) for perpetuating the myth that cast iron is porous, not knowing the basic chemistry of acids and bases (i.e., how vinegar neutralizes lye), and that lye is "deadly," is some Google searches and being a certified germaphobe. Is that about right?

As for my "credentials:" B.S. in Science and Mathematics, "A" level licenses in potable water, biological wastewater, physical/chemical wastewater, water distribution, and I recently retired after 32 years in the nuclear power industry as a chemistry supervisor. I have other credentials as well, but those are really the only ones pertinent here. At the end of the day though, my credentials ain't getting me a cup of coffee at Starbucks or anywhere else, for that matter. Point being.........."credentials" don't mean squat.
I readily admit that I am new to the cast iron hobby, and that I have no experience or education that would make me an informed source. That's why I came here, to try to get credible information.

The often repeated line that "I've been doing this for x-years, and it works, and I'm not dead yet" doesn't work either. The fact that something works doesn't make it safe. People do their own residential and commercial electrical work all the time, and each time, they get a result that "works" until their structure catches fire. Prior to that, they, too, claimed that "it's been working for 50 years, and it ain't burned yet". Bad results don't have to happen immediately; the long-term problems are a concern too.

It's not my intention to disparage anyone here, and I apologize for coming across that way. As I say, I have no credentials to back up my statements, other than what I consider to be of common concern. I was just hoping that there might be a few folks from the industry who could weigh in. That doesn't make this forum bad, but it tends to lessen the quality of the advice here, particular in regards to safety.

So, again, I apologize, and I really want you all to know that I do appreciate you being here. This is a fantastic hobby that I hope proves a bit financially rewarding to me.

BTW: I posed a question to the folks at Lodge, asking them of their opinion on the use of Lye and drain cleaner on cast iron. For what it's worth, here is their reply:



Quote:
Amanda Gholston
Today at 9:11 AM

To xxxxx@xxxxx.com

Hello Terry,

We don’t recommend using Lye or Drain Cleaner on Cast Iron Cookware.

To remove Rust Build up have the cast iron cookware sandblasted (at a local body or machine shop) then Re-Season in the oven Immediately (The cookware would need to be seasoned SEVERAL times in the oven after sandblasting).

There are three types of rust:

FLASH RUSTING

Usually, rusting on new pieces is “flash rusting”. Sometimes this may be seen on a piece that has been on display for a while in a store, and has been handled frequently.

Rubbing vegetable oil briskly with a cloth on the affected area can treat flash rusting.

PROFILE RUST

This is a more involved rust appearance, and can be felt on the cast iron piece because it “profiles” on the surface.

You will need to use steel wool or an abrasive soap pad (SOS, BRILLO, etc. – soap is okay to use at this time), to scrub the affected area. Don’t worry . . . you won’t hurt the cast iron. Once the piece has been scrubbed down to the raw cast iron, it should be re-seasoned immediately to prevent rusting.

SERIOUS RUST

This type of rust is covering the majority of the cast iron piece. These involve pieces that have been in a state of neglect for a long time, such as flea market or garage sale finds. No amount of hand scrubbing can remove this type rust.

The only course of action is to take the piece to a local machine shop or auto/body shop and have the item sandblasted. This will return the cast iron to its original raw form. TAKE THE PIECE HOME AND SEASON IT IMMEDIATELY!

Thank You,

Amanda Gholston

Customer Service

Lodge MFG
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