Cast Iron Collector Forums  
Google

Go Back   Cast Iron Collector Forums > General Discussion > Cast Iron Cleaning and Seasoning

Notices

Cast Iron Cleaning and Seasoning Help With and Tips & Techniques For Cast Iron Cookware Restoration

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-23-2015, 05:17 PM
J.Ottinger J.Ottinger is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Indianapolis, In
Posts: 45
Default Sacrificial Anode Material?

Does anyone know if I can use galvanised steel, (16-14 gauge), for my Etank Anode?
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 06-23-2015, 06:12 PM
EdgarLopez EdgarLopez is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: houston
Posts: 347
Default Re: Sacrificial Anode Material?

Is not recommended.the best is graphite.You may don't want to spend a lot of money on that,the second best and you can get it for free or real cheap is stainless steel,is what I have.how to get cheap? If you're good with tools you can get a stainless steel pot at flea market doesn't have to be pretty you can get the ogliest pot and tear it down and set it up, you can clean about 200 skillets with no problem
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-23-2015, 06:38 PM
Doug D. Doug D. is offline
Site Admin
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 6,175
Default Re: Sacrificial Anode Material?

Whenever the subject of sacrificial anode material comes up, there are to be expected the usual caveats against using whatever is being talked about. With stainless steel, there's the warning about hexavalent chromium, but that has been generally determined to not be a problem at the temps, pH, and voltages used for CI cleaning. I do see some people saying galvanized should not be used, but don't seem to ever recall hearing the reason why not. In my BBQing days, galvanized was the subject of much debate as a material for the construction of fireboxes and such. The critics cited the hazard of welding galvanized metals from the vaporization of the zinc contained. Zinc, however, does not vaporize until far beyond the temperatures of burning firewood or charcoal, somewhere in the neighborhood of 1600F. Before graphite, I used galvanized sheet metal for years in my electro tank. I would suppose it would similarly take more in the way of temp and voltage to get anything from the anode airborne or chemically bonded to the iron. I think, however, that whatever you use, disposal of the electrolyte should not be anywhere that would contaminate a source of potable water or migrate to food crops.

If galvanized is a concern, there are several other sources of cheap or free metal that will work just fine, cut open and flattened coffee cans being one. Graphite may be (relative to free) expensive up front, but in the long run promises to be more efficient and cost effective. You don't have to clean it, and one piece will probably last as long as the average collector collects.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-23-2015, 08:23 PM
JBPoole JBPoole is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: East Central Georgia.
Posts: 191
Default Re: Sacrificial Anode Material?

I have had good results with cookie sheets from estate sales. Sometimes gotten for 25 cents each.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-23-2015, 11:25 PM
W. Hilditch W. Hilditch is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Talking Rock, GA
Posts: 1,779
Default Re: Sacrificial Anode Material?

OK, you got me curious. What is the downside of using steel rebar?

Hilditch
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-23-2015, 11:33 PM
RobM RobM is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 356
Default Re: Sacrificial Anode Material?

I have I made when it comes to sacrificial anodes. Have a few clients that have scrap metals, currently running 1/8" stainless plate.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-24-2015, 08:56 AM
DougH DougH is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 293
Default Re: Sacrificial Anode Material?

Quote:
Originally Posted by W. Hilditch View Post
OK, you got me curious. What is the downside of using steel rebar?

Hilditch
I would say surface area of the rebar compared to the piece you're cleaning. I say this never having tried it, but it's the first thing that comes to mind.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-24-2015, 11:10 AM
JBPoole JBPoole is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: East Central Georgia.
Posts: 191
Default Re: Sacrificial Anode Material?

Yes, surface area. It's my understanding that the size and shape affect the "line of sight" between the two metal objects. Also have read that solid is better than objects with holes (is it called expanded metal?) like a grate.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 06-24-2015, 11:12 AM
EdgarLopez EdgarLopez is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: houston
Posts: 347
Default Re: Sacrificial Anode Material?

Quote:
Originally Posted by W. Hilditch View Post
OK, you got me curious. What is the downside of using steel rebar?

Hilditch
Using rebar works fine the only thing is smaller pice you have to clean it more frecuently, bigger pices stays leaner longer and works faster
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 06-24-2015, 12:25 PM
M_Osborne M_Osborne is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 130
Default Re: Sacrificial Anode Material?

I have been using rebar for years, surface area is a problem so I surround the outer edges of the tank with them. They are cheap and last quite a while so long as you remember to wire brush them. I just obtained graphite bars and will be giving that a try.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Advertisement

- Website Directory -

This site is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program,
an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn
advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com or its affiliates.
This page contains ads and links that earn commissions for CIC.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:10 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.