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  #21  
Old 01-30-2016, 10:23 AM
JMoss JMoss is offline
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Default Re: Cooking Tools

Kevin E
That is definitely end grain and a beautiful board. For what its worth every real butcher shop "butcher block table" I have ever seen has the end grain for a working surface. I'm sure they had a reason for that.

At the same breath I will say that before you posted that picture, I do not recollect ever seeing a home cutting board that had the end grain working surface.

Jack
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  #22  
Old 01-30-2016, 12:01 PM
Stan D Stan D is offline
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Default Re: Cooking Tools

Actually, no. This is what that cutting board is made of. While it doesn't specifically say so, this is black walnut. And your use of the phrase "edge grain" is wrong as well. The pic on the left shows a good example of edge grain(the white part). Edge grain isn't as useful as the inner areas. In most cases, edge grain doesn't have the qualities that a wood is known for. In uses where a harder wood is needed, the edge grain isn't as hard as the rest of the wood.



http://www.rusticmill.com/oregon1.jpg

The setting of your pic also proves my point. Notice the grain in the floor. That is certainly not end grain. Nice shoes, BTW. You can tell I didn't take that pic, there would be no shoes. Your cutting board is absolutely beautiful. I hope is serves you well for many years to come.
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  #23  
Old 01-30-2016, 12:10 PM
KevinE KevinE is offline
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Default Re: Cooking Tools

Well, I won't argue with you, but I will say you don't have a clue of what you're talking about. You may want to do a little more research before you spout off and make yourself look like an idiot.

Edit:

Oops! Too late. You already did.
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  #24  
Old 01-30-2016, 12:23 PM
Stan D Stan D is offline
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Default Re: Cooking Tools

There's no reason for name calling. I stopped doing that when I left grade school.

I've been hanging out and working in wood shops since I was 8 or 9, starting in my Dad's shop, which is now my shop. I turn 59 tomorrow. I have been working with traditional wooden boat builders for the last 12 years. I think that trumps your assumption.

I don't deny that end grain cutting boards aren't a thing. I'm just saying that isn't one. And while end grain boards are more attractive, they're not as strong.
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  #25  
Old 01-30-2016, 02:26 PM
W. Hilditch W. Hilditch is offline
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Default Re: Cooking Tools

A kitchen knife seldom dulls from wear, the edge rolls over like this: ‘J’. With end grain wood the knife edge gets to slip between the fibers with less stress than having to cut the fibers in half keeping the edge straight longer. A cut in the end grain of the wood has a tendency to self-heal while killing the bacteria and I suppose neutralizing toxins. Natural properties of the wood.

Cutting boards are made thin to not raise counter height too much and are seldom end grain due to the lack of structural integrity of short glue runs. Butcher blocks overcome this being at least 6” or 8” thick and more so all real butcher blocks are end grain. Butcher blocks last much longer than cutting boards because one is not slicing up the fibers. A butcher block normally has it’s own 4 legs.

This is my end grain cutting block. It is in-between a cutting board and a butcher block at 3 1/2” thick. Too high to use on the counter and no legs. So it is mounted on the end of the island at counter height. All my knives love it including the Shuns. This was about $2,000 less than a butcher block.



Hilditch
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  #26  
Old 01-30-2016, 04:37 PM
KevinE KevinE is offline
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Default Re: Cooking Tools

http://theboardsmith.com/

This is who made my board. I guess I should inform them that they don't make end grain cutting boards.
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  #27  
Old 01-30-2016, 05:11 PM
Stan D Stan D is offline
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Default Re: Cooking Tools

A good example of an end grain board. And also, kudos to your description of how a knife dulls. I would only question the idea that wood, regardless of grain, self heals or kills bacteria.

Kevin, I would only say that the pics on Boardsmith's website look more like end grain than your board. Some of the blocks in yours are too straight to be end grain. And almost all are too wavy for end grain as well. End grain is circular, for the most part. Damn pretty, though.

[SIZE=1]---------- Post added at 05:11 PM ---------- Previous post was at 04:59 PM ----------[/SIZE]

I would take this opportunity to say that I need to start making wood cutting boards. I just went back to Boardsmith, and their 2'X12"X18" for $211.00? That can't be worth that. I Googled it, and black walnut in 8/4 thick 5" to 9" wide is only $8.50 a board foot.

And for you non woodworkers, 8/4 is dimensional sizing, and is exactly 2", as opposed to a 2X4, which is not 2" or 4".
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  #28  
Old 01-30-2016, 05:38 PM
Bonnie Scott Bonnie Scott is offline
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Default Re: Cooking Tools

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stan D View Post
Key words.

And are you sure about the "end grain" thing? End grain is the more porous part of any wood. Every set of plans I've seen for cutting boards since the 7th grade specify side grain. The idea of using a cutting board is that they're less damaging to a blade than Formica or stone, and even the hardest of hard woods are soft enough. And while end grain is the softer side of wood, you want it to last, so side grain is best. The other thing that separates cutting boards from other wooden tools is that a properly made cutting board involves a coating of an oil, typically linseed oil(and in my opinion incorrect. Linseed oil is not food safe. Flax seed oil is a better choice IMHO).

The bottom line is that proper care is the key. Probably what scares me are those who don't care. Clearly no one here in that category.
Linseed oil and Flaxseed oil are the same thing.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linseed_oil
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  #29  
Old 01-30-2016, 06:00 PM
W. Hilditch W. Hilditch is offline
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Default Re: Cooking Tools

Kevin, did I say never? They will be happy to tell you thicker is stronger. Please note that the pieces of wood on your board are twice the size of mine to allow for longer glue runs. Better to hold the board together.

I cringe when I hit mine with a 27 oz cleaver, but do it. I wouldn't try that with a board as that sucker was made for a butcher block and wants to make kindling out of boards.

Hilditch
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  #30  
Old 01-30-2016, 06:15 PM
Doug D. Doug D. is offline
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Default Re: Cooking Tools

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonnie Scott View Post
Linseed oil and Flaxseed oil are the same thing.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linseed_oil
Technically, yes, but usually people talking about linseed oil are referring to that used for wood finishing which has been extracted from the plant using solvents, rather than cold pressed as is that for food grade flaxseed oil. "Boiled linseed oil" is not actually boiled but rather has had drying agents added to it.
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