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Cast Iron Cleaning and Seasoning Help With and Tips & Techniques For Cast Iron Cookware Restoration

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  #1  
Old 02-03-2015, 10:59 AM
JCameron JCameron is offline
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Default Bee's wax

It has been around forever also known as "Florida seasoning" Why dont I see any one talking about it here ?
Yes I use it on all my cast iron. My grandmother taught it to me and I know it to work well.
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  #2  
Old 02-03-2015, 11:02 AM
JBPoole JBPoole is offline
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Default Re: Bee's wax

I have not heard of this. Please bring us up to speed on this process. Thanks!
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  #3  
Old 02-03-2015, 11:48 AM
Doug D. Doug D. is offline
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Default Re: Bee's wax

There is also a product being talked about lately called "Crisbee", which appears to be a combo of shortening and beeswax. I would guess that a beeswax method doesn't get a lot of attention as it requires a product not usually found in the average kitchen, unlike the more commonly used oils.
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  #4  
Old 02-03-2015, 12:44 PM
JCameron JCameron is offline
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Default Re: Bee's wax

"In short, prepare your CI as you would for shortening type seasoning. Get it warm enough to melt the bee wax, getting a puddle. Soak this puddle up in a lint free cloth. Spread a coating of the wax all over the CI piece. Take a second lint free cloth and wipe the surfaces of the CI that you had coated.

"In the mean time, preheat your oven to 475minimum, 500 max.**

"When oven is up to temp, put piece on oven rack set at middle of oven. Bake CI for 1 hour plus. Then shut oven off and let it cool till you can handle it. Repeat the coating and wiping process, return to oven reheated to same temps. Again let it bake for an hour. Now you can repeat as many times as you like obviously the more times you do it the better the 'season coating.' When you finally let the CI get to room temp, note how black it is, and how hard and slick the surface feels.

"Now for fun and giggles give your piece a lite spray of non stick, heat it up, and fry an egg. When you go to pick it up and flip I'll bet you have a lot of trouble getting the egg on your spatula. You will chase it all around the pan.

"When you clean this piece now, use boiling water to cut residual oil, or grease. Wipe dry, heat it up to dry, and then you are ready to store unit. Bee wax will not turn rancid, it your pot does stink, it is because there is residual cooking grease in pot, or on lid.

"Note:
--Bee wax will be in a solid chunk, possibly even molded. Make sure you get 100% pure beeswax (food grade) and not the kind you buy in craft stores for candlemaking.

**Warning: if you get too much hotter than 500 deg. you will burn your seasoning off."
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  #5  
Old 02-03-2015, 01:49 PM
Glenn Brown Glenn Brown is offline
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Default Re: Bee's wax

That's interesting, as I think beeswax and honey are God's miracles for us. Beeswax can be used in so many ways, and honey is surely the elixir of the gods. I buy raw honey in 4# gallon jugs a couple of times a year from a local apiary. (Bee place) Pooh Bear would really be jealous of me. I also use beeswax and have some on hand. I'll have to try this. Thank you for the post and info.
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  #6  
Old 02-03-2015, 09:56 PM
RandyR RandyR is offline
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Default Re: Bee's wax

Interesting!

Gonna have to give this a try on a piece.
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  #7  
Old 02-04-2015, 09:40 AM
Bonnie Scott Bonnie Scott is offline
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Default Re: Bee's wax

Speaking from a nursing perspective I would advise against this method. Although beeswax does not contain harmful chemicals it is not digestible. In a person with a young healthy colon this would probably not cause a problem but as you get older it's just not that easy. I could easily see this aggravating or possibly even causing diverticulitis or an intestinal blockage.
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  #8  
Old 02-04-2015, 09:49 AM
JCameron JCameron is offline
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Default Re: Bee's wax

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonnie Scott View Post
Speaking from a nursing perspective I would advise against this method. Although beeswax does not contain harmful chemicals it is not digestible. In a person with a young healthy colon this would probably not cause a problem but as you get older it's just not that easy. I could easily see this aggravating or possibly even causing diverticulitis or an intestinal blockage.
@475 degrees the wax is polymerized and any pollen or pathogens are destroyed.
Just like lard or oils are polymerized .
Diverticulitis is caused from not eating enough roughage not from honey or bee's !
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  #9  
Old 02-07-2015, 10:51 PM
Craig B Craig B is offline
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Default Re: Bee's wax

I recently heard if the "crisbee" and it caught my interest. Now I'm just as interested in trying straight beeswax. Thanks for the instructions. Do you think it would have good results on a piece that's already seasoned with crisco, or best to start with a clean piece?
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  #10  
Old 02-07-2015, 11:58 PM
Glenn Brown Glenn Brown is offline
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Default Re: Bee's wax

I tried this on 2 pieces and it appeared to work really well. Haven't used them to cook with, yet. The amount of beeswax still left in the pan after wiping cannot amount to much. I googled up ingesting beeswax and it appears to be harmless in small amounts. I get my wax from a local apiary and filter it. I use a large screen sieve (6 in dia.) like a tea strainer. I use a brand of paper towel, I'll have to find out the brand for you. It works quite well and gets out most of the sediment/foreign stuff. It's what the apiary uses to filter the wax. I use 2 cup size plastic containers as molds--get them at the Dollar Store. Each block weighs about a pound.
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