Cast Iron Collector Forums  
Google

Go Back   Cast Iron Collector Forums > General Discussion > Cast Iron Cleaning and Seasoning

Notices

Cast Iron Cleaning and Seasoning Help With and Tips & Techniques For Cast Iron Cookware Restoration

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 06-05-2016, 09:35 PM
EdP EdP is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 184
Default Re: For those interested in flaxseed

Quote:
Originally Posted by CWorthing View Post
I am interested in the flax oil conditioning. I took a look at the Cooking Illustrated link and Item #1 in the instructions shows a serious flaw. There are no pores in cast iron. If you heat up cast iron it will expand but it will do so due to the laws of thermodynamics. What we are looking at is thermal expansion and the amount is based on the material which dictates the thermal expansion coefficient and with the change in temperature you can find the difference in size. BUT there are no air spaces left because of that and there are none to begin with. The Crisbee website makes the same error. it won't cause you any problems, it is just unnecessary.

Speaking of Crisbee, I just ordered a "puck" from them and I am going to examine the density of the puck and compare it to the density of Crisco and Beeswax and should be able to come up with a close approximation. Won't be exactly the same but I doubt if that would matter. I just do not want to violate anyone's legal information. I made a mixture of food grade mineral oil and beeswax for use on turned wood bowls that I am messing with.

One other issue and I don't know if any of you have tried this. I see all the lye bath instructions to get rid of rust. There is an old tried and true method to do the same thing. It is called rust bluing, an old standby finishing method of coating firearms. I have been doing that for 30 years as a commercial (although part time) enterprise.

In short, red rust (Fe2O3) is an unstable compound and will continue to "propagate". The simplest way to stop it is to expose it to steam or boiling water for 10 to 20 minutes. Best if the water is distilled. What you create is magnetite (Fe3O4) which is a stable compound. You can then use a stainless brush to remove any scale and it will not continue.
Thanks CWorthing for your technical insight. Spot on the thermodynamics. Interesting. On a side note, I use Kroil for rust removal on hand tools and similar. Would the variances in CI chemical/metal alloys from manufacturer to manufacturer of old and new iron make in difference in your analysis/explanation? BTW, so far no peeling, flaking or bad odors leaching into food while cooking with my flax seed seasoned skillet experiment.

Last edited by EdP; 06-05-2016 at 10:00 PM.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #22  
Old 06-06-2016, 01:54 PM
CWorthing CWorthing is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 14
Default Re: For those interested in flaxseed

EC Price,

Cast iron is basically iron, carbon and silicon. Not sure what other items foundries may have added. But under the right conditions, cast iron will rust and if you expose rust to boiling water, or even steam for at least 10 minutes it will change to another stable form and will stop the rust at that spot. You would need to use a loose wire brush to remove any loose particles.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 06-06-2016, 03:35 PM
Bryan T. Bryan T. is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 22
Default Re: For those interested in flaxseed

CWorthing,

From what I gather, you're supposed to heat and then cool cast iron slowly in order to not warp or crack it, no ? With that said, wouldn't pouring boiling water or submerging a cast iron skillet in boiling water, be asking for trouble ?
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 06-06-2016, 03:40 PM
Doug D. Doug D. is offline
Site Admin
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 5,762
Default Re: For those interested in flaxseed

As far as cast iron is concerned, 212F is more like warm than hot. Heating the entire pan at once in hot water is akin to heating it in an oven. Warping and cracking are typically the result of heating an empty pan too fast on a hot burner. One part expands rapidly while the rest does not, and therein lies the problem. As long as it's not plunged in cold water at that temp and is allowed to come to room temp on its own, there should be no problem.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 06-06-2016, 05:59 PM
Bryan T. Bryan T. is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 22
Default Re: For those interested in flaxseed

Makes sense. Thank you for the information.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 06-13-2016, 12:19 AM
CWorthing CWorthing is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 14
Default Re: For those interested in flaxseed

EC Price,
I did a search and found the recipe for Crisbee that people were using. It was 5 parts Crisco to 1 part beeswax.

I purchased a puck and measured the density of it and found it was .9186 grams per ml (too many places I know). I then measured the density of Crisco and got .817 (very close to what I found on Google) and then I measured some Beeswax I had on hand and got right around .96 grams per ml. A mix of 5 to 1 would be .84 grams per ml and no where near what their product is. It surprised me very much but what I found was 1/3 Crisco to 2/3 Beeswax. I have not mixed up any of it yet but will soon. I have it on a spreadsheet if anyone wants to check the math.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 06-13-2016, 06:04 AM
EdP EdP is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 184
Default Re: For those interested in flaxseed

Quote:
Originally Posted by CWorthing View Post
EC Price,
I did a search and found the recipe for Crisbee that people were using. It was 5 parts Crisco to 1 part beeswax.

I purchased a puck and measured the density of it and found it was .9186 grams per ml (too many places I know). I then measured the density of Crisco and got .817 (very close to what I found on Google) and then I measured some Beeswax I had on hand and got right around .96 grams per ml. A mix of 5 to 1 would be .84 grams per ml and no where near what their product is. It surprised me very much but what I found was 1/3 Crisco to 2/3 Beeswax. I have not mixed up any of it yet but will soon. I have it on a spreadsheet if anyone wants to check the math.
Ok thanks CWorthing. So, you are saying that 1/3 Crisco and 2/3 Beeswax will yield a density of approximately .9186 that would approximate Crisbee? And where can I find food grade beeswax? A particular brand? Btw, the flax oil I am using in my experiment is the Whole Foods house brand. It is 100% pure, organic and filtered. Not sure what filtered means as opposed to the unfiltered type. Blended flax oil with other ingredients will not work. But anyway so far in my experiment, no issues of bad, leeching tastes from cooking, flaking or peeling. A few caveats: There is a little "smoking" or more like evaporation maybe of the flax oil on the first initial application on bare iron. As I progressed along on subsequent coats, there was less "smoking". And, I used the maximum oven temperature of my stove at 550 F. The iron I am using in my experiment is a new manufactured Lodge 10-1/2 in skillet I purchased a few years ago. The reason I used this piece of iron is that I wanted to use it often and try to smooth out the rough interior with frequent use instead of using mechanical means. All the rest of my old iron I use Crisbee and the interior surfaces are relatively slick compared to new Lodge. The slickest interior of any old iron I have ever seen or used is a 100 year old Wagner #8 in my collection. Interior surface is literally slick as glass.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 06-13-2016, 12:23 PM
CWorthing CWorthing is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 14
Default Re: For those interested in flaxseed

I did some net research this last winter on "food grade beeswax" and basically found that there is no standard for it. Well you see it so labeled, the seller is gilding the lily. Organic has a "standard" that is not really achievable or more accurately verifiable. It requires that the hives are placed so that they are not near any place that uses pesticides. The bee keepers admit that they have no way of knowing that or even knowing where and how far their bees travel. There is nothing in the wax that is going to do any harm to you. .

I have had my best luck obtaining beeswax on Craigs list. I a few pounds last winter in Peoria AZ for $7 a pound. If you wanted to get it raw and clean it yourself, you can get it cheaper. Forget trying to get it from a bee keeper for pocket change as it is a nice money maker bi product of their business. You can also get it at Amazon but will pay more for it,

Cleaning it is not that big a chore. Easiest way is the put it in a container of water and boil it. The beeswax will melt and the debris will sink to the bottom. Or most of it will. You can then sieve it after you melt it again and make it cleaner. A LOT easier to buy it clean.

Easiest way is to buy it cleaned and the bees wax I got in AZ was very clean. Found another source in western WA and will be over that way next week and going to pick more up. I use it with food grade Mineral Oil to make a balm to treat wood bowls and cutting boards.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 06-13-2016, 03:54 PM
CWorthing CWorthing is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 14
Default Re: For those interested in flaxseed

Sorry, I did not answer your first question. Yes, using one third Crisco and two thirds beeswax will give you a density of .9186 that is the same as Crisbee, or close enough.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 06-14-2016, 05:40 AM
EdP EdP is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 184
Default Re: For those interested in flaxseed

Ok, thanks CWorthing.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Advertisement

This site is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program,
an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn
advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com or its affiliates.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.