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Cast Iron Cleaning and Seasoning Help With and Tips & Techniques For Cast Iron Cookware Restoration

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  #11  
Old 04-14-2016, 12:03 PM
Stan D Stan D is offline
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Default Re: For those interested in flaxseed

I've been using Flax seed oil, although I only do 3 rounds as opposed to 5. I love the looks.
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  #12  
Old 04-14-2016, 12:26 PM
M_Osborne M_Osborne is offline
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Default Re: For those interested in flaxseed

I have tried many different oils over the years. I have not been impressed with flax seed, it looks nice on my show pieces but has not held up well on my users. The smell and cost has turned me off.

More recently I have tried using the Crisbee formula (crisco and beeswax) and have been happy with the results. Very easy to make your own and it gives a nice dark brown almost black finish. The smell is almost pleasant.
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  #13  
Old 04-15-2016, 01:32 PM
EdP EdP is offline
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Default Re: For those interested in flaxseed

Quote:
Originally Posted by M_Osborne View Post
I have tried many different oils over the years. I have not been impressed with flax seed, it looks nice on my show pieces but has not held up well on my users. The smell and cost has turned me off.

More recently I have tried using the Crisbee formula (crisco and beeswax) and have been happy with the results. Very easy to make your own and it gives a nice dark brown almost black finish. The smell is almost pleasant.
I use Crisbee too on all of my old iron and works great.

[SIZE=1]---------- Post added at 02:32 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:25 PM ----------[/SIZE]

So far in my experiment, no chipping or flaking or pealing.
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  #14  
Old 05-11-2016, 01:41 PM
KyleW KyleW is offline
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Default Re: For those interested in flaxseed

I followed this exact seasoning procedure (Cooks Illustrated/ATK), but ended up with wavy or pooling oil marks in my pan.

I was new to this process, and naively thought that just flipping pan over gravity would prevent this from happening. I now know from further research I should have checked pan about 10 minutes in to each seasoning cook and re-wiped.

The waves seem pretty well baked in. Do I have to to start all over and strip the seasoning or will this pattern go away over time? Or maybe do a few acidic food cooks?

The polymerized flax seems really hard. I did 5 or 6 treatments until I realized I had really baked in those waves of oil. Judging from the parts of the pan that don't have the wave pattern, I bet if I had wiped the pan would have an incredible black mirror finish from the flaxseed oil.



Thanks
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  #15  
Old 05-11-2016, 03:09 PM
Doug D. Doug D. is offline
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Default Re: For those interested in flaxseed

The two options would be:

Strip it and start over. Might take all of 5 minutes in a lye bath or in a bag with oven cleaner.

Just cook with it, and eventually the long term seasoning will obscure any unevenness.

It's unfortunate that CI/ATK decided to hop on the flaxseed oil bandwagon without realizing that, as most collectors already have, it's quite often not the be-all to end-all it's purported to be.
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  #16  
Old 05-13-2016, 06:25 PM
JustinW JustinW is offline
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Default Re: For those interested in flaxseed

Quote:
Originally Posted by M_Osborne View Post
I have tried many different oils over the years. I have not been impressed with flax seed, it looks nice on my show pieces but has not held up well on my users. The smell and cost has turned me off.

More recently I have tried using the Crisbee formula (crisco and beeswax) and have been happy with the results. Very easy to make your own and it gives a nice dark brown almost black finish. The smell is almost pleasant.
What ratio Crisco:beeswax do you use when you make your own?
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  #17  
Old 05-16-2016, 09:27 PM
EdP EdP is offline
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Default Re: For those interested in flaxseed

So far in my experiment, no cracking, or bad food odor leeching into cooked food from using flax seed oil seasoning in the Lodge skillet I am using to conduct experiment.
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  #18  
Old 06-04-2016, 07:05 PM
CWorthing CWorthing is offline
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Default Re: For those interested in flaxseed

I am interested in the flax oil conditioning. I took a look at the Cooking Illustrated link and Item #1 in the instructions shows a serious flaw. There are no pores in cast iron. If you heat up cast iron it will expand but it will do so due to the laws of thermodynamics. What we are looking at is thermal expansion and the amount is based on the material which dictates the thermal expansion coefficient and with the change in temperature you can find the difference in size. BUT there are no air spaces left because of that and there are none to begin with. The Crisbee website makes the same error. it won't cause you any problems, it is just unnecessary.

Speaking of Crisbee, I just ordered a "puck" from them and I am going to examine the density of the puck and compare it to the density of Crisco and Beeswax and should be able to come up with a close approximation. Won't be exactly the same but I doubt if that would matter. I just do not want to violate anyone's legal information. I made a mixture of food grade mineral oil and beeswax for use on turned wood bowls that I am messing with.

One other issue and I don't know if any of you have tried this. I see all the lye bath instructions to get rid of rust. There is an old tried and true method to do the same thing. It is called rust bluing, an old standby finishing method of coating firearms. I have been doing that for 30 years as a commercial (although part time) enterprise.

In short, red rust (Fe2O3) is an unstable compound and will continue to "propagate". The simplest way to stop it is to expose it to steam or boiling water for 10 to 20 minutes. Best if the water is distilled. What you create is magnetite (Fe3O4) which is a stable compound. You can then use a stainless brush to remove any scale and it will not continue.
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  #19  
Old 06-04-2016, 07:17 PM
Doug D. Doug D. is offline
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Default Re: For those interested in flaxseed

Those talking about pores in cast iron are simply repeating misinformation they've read elsewhere. But since it sounds plausible and it's on the internet, it must be true, no? Actually, lye has no effect on rust, it's the electrolysis tank for that. I suppose if boiling water or steam was as effective but simpler and less hazardous, it might be embraced, but electro tanks do have that kind of techno-cool cachet. If you search crisbee on here, the proportions are somewhere. I don't use it, so I'm not sure offhand.
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  #20  
Old 06-04-2016, 08:03 PM
CWorthing CWorthing is offline
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Default Re: For those interested in flaxseed

Doug, you might be right about the acceptance. It just seems too easy. It has been around as a process for firearms since the 1800's. If you had rust inside the pan all you would have to do it put water in it and boil it for 10+ minutes. An electric drill with a thin wire wheel would do a good job as a "carding brush" (gunsmithing term for .... taaadaaa... a stainless steel wire wheel). And what happens visually is that the red rust turns black.

I have suggested at times when someone has some rust on a barrel to fire up a tea kettle and hold the rusty area in the stream from the spout for an appropriate amount of time. Others have used large PVC pipe as a steam "cabinet". Still not big enough for a pan.
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