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  #11  
Old 01-28-2016, 03:13 PM
Stan D Stan D is offline
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Default Re: Cooking Tools

I cringe whenever I see wooden kitchen tools. That comes from when I worked in restaurants back in high school. Here in Virginia(and probably other states) you weren't allowed to have wooden tools of any kind in a kitchen. Wood is somewhat porous, and will absorb juices and such. In some cases,you can see it. Some see character, the state sees bacteria. I have to come in and clean the one wooden spoon my wife uses and clean it before it dries, as she will leave it and not think twice about it.

Not that the state is always right. One of the places I worked at was Lums, and we couldn't cook the hot dogs in beer( which is what Lums was famous for) because of the alcohol laws.
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  #12  
Old 01-28-2016, 04:28 PM
W. Hilditch W. Hilditch is offline
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Default Re: Cooking Tools

Although PHD’s at respected universities keep proving over and over that wood utensils and cutting boards harbor less bacteria than other materials, some don’t believe them. ie:

http://www.foodsafetysite.com/consum...se_article=143

Oh well. Some believe we are not in, or responsible for, global warming and the earth is flat.

Hilditch
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  #13  
Old 01-28-2016, 04:48 PM
KevinE KevinE is offline
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Default Re: Cooking Tools

^^^^What he said. There are lots of studies out there proving properly cared for wood is safe for use as cooking utensils, cutting boards, serving plates, etc. I've been using my black walnut end grain cutting board and wooden spoons/spatulas for years and haven't gotten salmon vanilla yet.
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  #14  
Old 01-28-2016, 06:27 PM
Mark H Mark H is offline
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Default Re: Cooking Tools

Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinE View Post
^^^^What he said. There are lots of studies out there proving properly cared for wood is safe for use as cooking utensils, cutting boards, serving plates, etc. I've been using my black walnut end grain cutting board and wooden spoons/spatulas for years and haven't gotten salmon vanilla yet.
Enjoy your wood but do not use it for cooking or serving in my state. Among other things I have an outdoor catering company. Bbq, oysters roasts etc.
I was fined last year for serving bbq in wooden dough bowls. Been doing for years. It's under review but I will have to pay a major fine and cease such activities. Many great reviews with no issues. I am supposed to use heating trays. i may get out of the business but it has been a good one for me and the folks that work for me. Recently the health department has requested that I use non wood tables for oyster roasts I refused. They suggested 316 ss tops. The cost will close my biz and the twenty an hour I pay my folks will end.
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  #15  
Old 01-28-2016, 06:54 PM
W. Hilditch W. Hilditch is offline
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Default Re: Cooking Tools

Here in GA for me to sell a hot dog out of a cart I need to have 5 sinks in the prep kitchen. Also the cart has to be screen in to eliminate flies.

Hilditch
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  #16  
Old 01-29-2016, 12:04 AM
Stan D Stan D is offline
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Default Re: Cooking Tools

Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinE View Post
^^^^What he said. There are lots of studies out there proving properly cared for wood is safe for use as cooking utensils, cutting boards, serving plates, etc. I've been using my black walnut end grain cutting board and wooden spoons/spatulas for years and haven't gotten salmon vanilla yet.
Key words.

And are you sure about the "end grain" thing? End grain is the more porous part of any wood. Every set of plans I've seen for cutting boards since the 7th grade specify side grain. The idea of using a cutting board is that they're less damaging to a blade than Formica or stone, and even the hardest of hard woods are soft enough. And while end grain is the softer side of wood, you want it to last, so side grain is best. The other thing that separates cutting boards from other wooden tools is that a properly made cutting board involves a coating of an oil, typically linseed oil(and in my opinion incorrect. Linseed oil is not food safe. Flax seed oil is a better choice IMHO).

The bottom line is that proper care is the key. Probably what scares me are those who don't care. Clearly no one here in that category.
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  #17  
Old 01-29-2016, 08:03 AM
DSBradley DSBradley is offline
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Default Re: Cooking Tools

Well AFAIK, every board had two side grains and two end grains. But aside from that, they've been using wood for eating for centuries. I remember growing up when the question about wood-handled knives was all the rage. Bottom line is cook your food, it kills whatever your cleaning method misses. It's like the saccharin scare a few years ago, everyone gave it up until it came out that you had to drink something like 40 gallons a day to develop a problem.

Scott
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  #18  
Old 01-29-2016, 09:37 AM
Doug D. Doug D. is offline
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Default Re: Cooking Tools

Quote:
Originally Posted by DSBradley View Post
Bottom line is cook your food, it kills whatever your cleaning method misses.
Food-borne illness is not from bacteria but from the toxins in the waste they produce. The normal heat of cooking will kill the bacteria but will not neutralize the toxins.
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  #19  
Old 01-30-2016, 09:40 AM
Sharon Shuman Sharon Shuman is offline
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Default Re: Cooking Tools

In the matter of wooden cutting boards: Just yesterday my hubby made the remark that our wood boards have never caused us any illness. My 2 boards are 47 and about 80 years old. I do believe in scrubbing them with very hot water and Dawn or other strong dish detergent, and as with my wooden spoons, I remove food from them as soon as I finish the task at hand. Commercial kitchens are a whole different beast from home kitchens, hence the sometimes crazy sounding rules. I would never give up my wood utensils, because I use CI and other older pans, and don't want to damage them. By the bye, I have my Mom's potato masher, flour sifter and pastry cutter, all from the 1920's or '30's--they made them to last in those days!

Last edited by Sharon Shuman; 01-30-2016 at 10:02 AM. Reason: Wrong info. corrected
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  #20  
Old 01-30-2016, 09:41 AM
KevinE KevinE is offline
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Default Re: Cooking Tools

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stan D View Post
Key words.

And are you sure about the "end grain" thing? End grain is the more porous part of any wood. Every set of plans I've seen for cutting boards since the 7th grade specify side grain. The idea of using a cutting board is that they're less damaging to a blade than Formica or stone, and even the hardest of hard woods are soft enough. And while end grain is the softer side of wood, you want it to last, so side grain is best. The other thing that separates cutting boards from other wooden tools is that a properly made cutting board involves a coating of an oil, typically linseed oil(and in my opinion incorrect. Linseed oil is not food safe. Flax seed oil is a better choice IMHO).

The bottom line is that proper care is the key. Probably what scares me are those who don't care. Clearly no one here in that category.
Yes, I'm absolutely certain my cutting board is end grain. End grain is not softer wood, but since it is oriented differently than edge grain (what you call side grain) a knife edge can more easily slip slightly into the wood fiber without damage to the knife or the wood. Whether or not end grain is better for knives is probably debatable, but I certainly find it more aesthetically pleasing. I don't know that edge grain boards last longer, but I know I'll never wear this board out in my life time so I'm not worried about it. I do oil my board about once a month or so, but I would never use a vegetable, animal, or nut oil of any kind on it because they go rancid. I use only mineral oil on my cutting boards and wooden cooking utensils. It is food safe and doesn't go rancid.

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