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Cast Iron Cleaning and Seasoning Help With and Tips & Techniques For Cast Iron Cookware Restoration

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  #21  
Old 09-16-2015, 03:48 PM
Doug D. Doug D. is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

Lye does nothing for rust. But it does work on grease-containing carbonaceous build-up without damage to the iron. It can in fact be a rust inhibitor at the strength commonly used for cleaning. Lodge may not recommend it, but certainly from a standpoint of liability, not one of damage.

Collectible vintage cast iron cookware should never be sandblasted, or have done to it any other mechanical method of cleaning which alters the original as-cast or as-polish ground surface.
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  #22  
Old 09-16-2015, 04:31 PM
Dan Farmer Dan Farmer is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

I would sandblast a modern Lodge. Might actually make it better. I would NEVER EVER EVER sandblast (or with other materials than sand) a valued vintage CI. You would totally ruin it. I'm sure Lodge is just taking the legally cautious approach with their answer.
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  #23  
Old 09-16-2015, 04:51 PM
RLMuse RLMuse is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

Quote:
Originally Posted by T.Winchester View Post
I hope you're not suggesting that if it was good for them in 1900 it's good for us. Many an illness spread as a result of this type of unsanitary condition. I guess I know now why women insist on rinsing meats before cooking

No, I was responding to a previous post which stated: Also, I'm sure my grandma's butcher sanitized properly. I would not buy meat from someone who didn't. You would?

I was stating that his grandma's butcher most likely wasn't using a bleach solution that kills germs, aka "sanitizing", and that most people back then did indeed buy their meat from someone who didn't sanitize.

[SIZE=1]---------- Post added at 02:51 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:47 PM ----------[/SIZE]

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Farmer View Post
I would sandblast a modern Lodge. Might actually make it better. I would NEVER EVER EVER sandblast (or with other materials than sand) a valued vintage CI. You would totally ruin it. I'm sure Lodge is just taking the legally cautious approach with their answer.
I have actually taken a modern Lodge and used a hand sander on the cooking surface. After sanding it, I then took a honing stone and poured some oil on the cooking surface and essentially honed the surface smooth as glass.

Cooks as good as any Griswold I have, although it still requires a forklift to get it out from under the kitchen counter.
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  #24  
Old 09-16-2015, 05:29 PM
RobM RobM is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

You asked, you got a response. What more do you want Winchester...?

Quote:
Originally Posted by T.Winchester View Post
BTW: I posed a question to the folks at Lodge, asking them of their opinion on the use of Lye and drain cleaner on cast iron. For what it's worth, here is their reply:
You just go right ahead and get all your cast sandblasted. Definitely safe.

But, if you sandblast an old piece that is worth money, it will be worth squat. Sandblasting new lodge? Go for it, it's not collectable and is easily replaceable.

Sandblast an old Erie? You get what you get. It'll upset more than a few collectors. Lye is safe. I suggest you use some google-fu to find out what foods you may be eating that either contain sodium hydroxide or as part of the process.


You come here, telling people you're new to the game but don't want to listen to reason. I don't get it.
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  #25  
Old 09-17-2015, 07:41 AM
CJMunnich CJMunnich is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

I stopped by an antique mall last weekend near Tomah, WI. There was a booth in there with an assortment of old CI. All of it was sandblasted and painted. The surfaces were rough and the skillets didn't feel right when I picked them up. Can't explain it. All I thought was how they were ruined, at least for me. They also wanted a mint for each piece.
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  #26  
Old 09-17-2015, 01:48 PM
T.Winchester T.Winchester is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

Quote:
Originally Posted by RobM View Post
You asked, you got a response. What more do you want Winchester...?



You just go right ahead and get all your cast sandblasted. Definitely safe.

But, if you sandblast an old piece that is worth money, it will be worth squat. Sandblasting new lodge? Go for it, it's not collectable and is easily replaceable.

Sandblast an old Erie? You get what you get. It'll upset more than a few collectors. Lye is safe. I suggest you use some google-fu to find out what foods you may be eating that either contain sodium hydroxide or as part of the process.


You come here, telling people you're new to the game but don't want to listen to reason. I don't get it.
Rob, your words come across very harsh.

I simply included what was written to me, I wasn't trying to endorse their methods. I, too, thought that, by the way she worded it, that it was a liability issue.

I'm not sold on, nor completely put off by the Lye treatment; just trying to have a conversation.

And I am listening.
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  #27  
Old 09-17-2015, 02:01 PM
Dan Farmer Dan Farmer is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

You (T. Winchester) asked how we know that vinegar can neutralize lye. It is simple science. No magic at all. An acid neutralizes a base.

Lye is what is used to treat corn to make hominy (as in, grits) and masa (as in corn tortillas). It is used to make soap. And many other things that we take for granted. See Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lye#Food_uses As with so many things, it is all about knowing how to use it. Don't fear it... just educate yourself about it and you'll be fine.
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  #28  
Old 09-17-2015, 06:21 PM
RobM RobM is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

Quote:
Originally Posted by T.Winchester View Post
Rob, your words come across very harsh.

I simply included what was written to me, I wasn't trying to endorse their methods. I, too, thought that, by the way she worded it, that it was a liability issue.

I'm not sold on, nor completely put off by the Lye treatment; just trying to have a conversation.

And I am listening.
If I came off as harsh, I apologize, wasn't my intention...

When I started back into cast iron last year, I made every mistake in the book by following incorrect advice.

Have 2 old McClary dutch ovens - my beloved bread makers - that I gave a ride in the fire pit as it was recommended on another site. They are now spinners, but still great breadmakers. Included with those dutch ovens were a couple of old lodge skillets and a couple of Wagners.
Wagner National number 9 in immaculate condition. Took a wire wheel to a few small spots as oven cleaner wouldn't clean it. Ended up with high spots on the surface that won't season because of it, the pan sucks now, done.
I have a couple of friends that have sandblasted really old skillets - only to find out afterward that they were worth some money, but are now greatly reduced and as far as i'm concerned - ruined pieces of history.

Both lye and electrolysis are definitely the way to go. Now that I have the right information from the right people, it's wonderful. Forums like this have a huge culmination of experience and expertise in all areas of cast iron - and i'm no expert.

There is so much information out there, so many ways to do things - and some pushy people when it comes to what they believe to be true. You are getting the right advice here. Now whether you choose to take it, that's up to you.

I personally use a lye bath ratio of 4 gallons of water to 1 pound of lye, this does the heavy lifting. Then if needed, it goes into the electro bath. I don't neutralize the lye, just scrub it in water, then soap and water. It's clean when done. Just my 2 cents.
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  #29  
Old 09-17-2015, 07:50 PM
Rick Hunter Rick Hunter is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

I agree with you Rob. I too made a lot of "cast iron" mistakes" due to bad internet and other collector sites advise. As a new collector a couple of years ago I just wanted to "rush" the process and get my pans clean and black. I too use lye on pans. And yes...simple washing with water neutralizes the Lye. Have done it for years and the results have always worked well!
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  #30  
Old 09-17-2015, 10:20 PM
RobM RobM is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Hunter View Post
I just wanted to "rush" the process and get my pans clean and black.
I think that was the big part of it, just wanted to get it done. Cast takes time, now I don't care if it's sitting in a lye bath for a week or two.

Have an old Wagner number 8 griddle hanging on my wall that i'll keep to the bitter end. It's a reminder of what I will never do again and isn't sellable. It "was" a beautiful piece, til it took a trip through the fire pit, a round with the wire wheel and a go with a flap sander. The surface is a mess and will never get fixed.
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