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Cast Iron Cleaning and Seasoning Help With and Tips & Techniques For Cast Iron Cookware Restoration

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  #1  
Old 09-14-2015, 02:26 AM
T.Winchester T.Winchester is offline
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Default Seasoned Pans

At what point does baked on oil become rancid, or even susceptible to salmonella, or is this even a possibility? If it's possible, does the next heating kill whatever salmonella is on the skillet?

I ask this because I've see people use a skillet that has been sitting for long periods of time (even the next day) with the previous dinner's grease still in it. Of course they usually spatula the grease out firs, but they don't wash it. Properly seasoning and cleaning each time (with water only) doesn't seem to be that far fetched.

So, how far out in left field am I on this? Let me have it!!
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  #2  
Old 09-14-2015, 08:24 AM
EdgarLopez EdgarLopez is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

If you pre heat the skillet before cook any thing on it, is enough heat to kill bacteria,the skillet reaches higher temperatures by it self.The people you see doing that still alive and do that every time they cook,that means is safe (nasty) but safe.Enjoy your meal.
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Old 09-14-2015, 11:50 AM
KevinE KevinE is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

People have been doing that for hundreds of years. Apparently it hasn't killed anyone yet. It's extremely rare for me to wash (even with just plain water) my CI and especially the CI that's used for bacon and eggs. Lightly scrape it with the (metal) spatula if it needs it, dump the grease in a coffee can, wipe with a paper towel, and back on the stove top it goes until I use it the next time.
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Old 09-14-2015, 12:33 PM
DougH DougH is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

From what I've heard, oil is not a good medium for bacteria growth, so the risk is minimal.

I rarely wash my skillets. I'll start with paper towel, and if that doesn't do it, I'll use a non scratch sponge and hot water, and that will clean anything stuck. I will use soap when I have cooked fish...fish is the only thing I've noticed that tends to leave a smell behind.
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  #5  
Old 09-14-2015, 12:44 PM
J. Fisher J. Fisher is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

I think it's not fair to say that it hasn't killed anybody yet, maybe it has or maybe it's made people sick, or just given them mild indigestion. Germ theory is still a relatively new idea and just because grandma never washed her pans doesn't mean we should always do the same. Many doctors were't even washing their hands until the 1800s. Even today, people in many parts of the world lack clean water or knowledge of good hygiene practices. There is nothing magically anti-bacterial about cast iron. If you create conditions for bacteria to thrive it will. It does not discriminate. When you heat something, you may kill it's germs but you can't kill it's poop. That's why cooking spoiled chicken doesn't magically make it ok to eat.

I don't mean to say I always wash my pans. In fact, most of the time I don't. I'm lucky to have my seasoning good enough that most of the time, there is nothing but oil left in the pan. When I make eggs, I just wipe out the excess oil with a paper towel. If I cook something that leaves some crud, I run it under water with a soapless sponge or a scraper. I try to leave nothing visible in my pan that could possibly spoil if it sat around for a couple days. If the pan is extra gross, I'm not afraid to use a bit of soap here and there.

I think it's always a good idea just to use your best judgment when it comes to a dirty CI pan, and don't follow strict rules about "always washing" or "never washing." Grandma was smart because she used common sense, and that's what we should be doing to.
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Old 09-14-2015, 01:29 PM
RobM RobM is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

Quote:
Originally Posted by J. Fisher View Post
Grandma was smart because she used common sense, and that's what we should be doing to.
I think our Grandma's had immune systems that would rival a cockroach too. My Great grandmother said something like that at 105 years of age.

I'm guilty of leaving greasy pans on the stove after cooking breakfast, and use them again the next day after a quick wipe. The heat will kill anything in it, but I'll still wash it if I find a fly drowned in whatever is left over in the pan.
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  #7  
Old 09-14-2015, 02:34 PM
W. Hilditch W. Hilditch is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

"I think our Grandma's had immune systems that would rival a cockroach too."

Love it. Why? She ate her pint of dirt (or maybe a peck) and some bacteria and germs along the way to build up her immune system. Didn't use germ wipes for the door handle on the outhouse. A sterile environment will not build a good immune system. Not good for todays kids.

Ask yourself; How often did her butcher wash his cutting block with soap and hot water? There is common sense and there is paranoid. Common sense says germ poop should not be an issue in your life, even if there was such a thing.

Hilditch
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  #8  
Old 09-14-2015, 02:55 PM
J. Fisher J. Fisher is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

I did not mean poop as in feces- its just an easier way to visualize why you can't make spoiled meat edible just by cooking it. A better word for bacteria poop is toxins. As some bacteria grow they produce toxins than normal cooking temperatures cannot make safe. The most well known being botulism. Pretending this doesn't happen doesn't make it safe.

Also, I'm sure my grandma's butcher sanitized properly. I would not buy meat from someone who didn't. You would?
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  #9  
Old 09-14-2015, 03:25 PM
RobM RobM is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

Quote:
Originally Posted by J. Fisher View Post
I did not mean poop as in feces- its just an easier way to visualize why you can't make spoiled meat edible just by cooking it. A better word for bacteria poop is toxins. As some bacteria grow they produce toxins than normal cooking temperatures cannot make safe. The most well known being botulism. Pretending this doesn't happen doesn't make it safe.

Also, I'm sure my grandma's butcher sanitized properly. I would not buy meat from someone who didn't. You would?
I'm starting to think we are going to sanitize ourselves out of existence.

My Great Grandmother was born in 1890, died at 105 years of age in 1995. Used to love hearing her stories of growing up. Root cellars were common back then to keep food from freezing in winter and keep cool in summer. All were just holes in the ground, dirt walls and whatever bugs lived underground. Mom rented a house when I was a kid, I found an old root cellar that was full of old veggies, no idea how long they had been there but it was an old cellar. If you've never had aged cellar potatoes, you're missing out. Best french fries ever, so sweet.

Meats were salted or smoked for long term storage, fish was salted and dried, and all stored underground with whatever bugs and worms lived there. She'd butter a piece of bread and have to pick the maggots out before she ate. Sometimes the meat and fish got infested, wasn't being tossed. There was nothing sanitary when she was growing up, and there's lots of longevity in my family. We're going back to a day when lead was considered safe, asbestos was too...

I'm sure some got sick, others died from whatever but that happens today. I don't worry about a few germs. I can only imagine what has gone through my system just in childhood from playing in the sand with dinkies - with the neighborhood cats and all.
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  #10  
Old 09-14-2015, 03:49 PM
J. Fisher J. Fisher is offline
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Default Re: Seasoned Pans

Rob- I totally get that. I love cured meats and would love to try cellared potatoes! I'm really interested in preservation through fermentation specifically. I've made sauerkraut, beer, and I hope to get a mother for kombucha from my friend this weekend. I've made jam with my grandmother many times. I am not afraid of the bugs around us. I'm impressed your grandma lived a long and healthy life. She probably ate a lot less preservatives than we do, and I'm jealous of that. There is a lot we can learn from our relatives that still totally applies today.

In 1900, 143 of every 100,000 died of gastrointestinal infections. I could not even find a number for present day, because it is so rare now.

I'm not advocating everybody worry incessantly about sanitation. As I said above I don't wash my pans most of the time. I don't often worry about these things either. I have used soap twice that i can remember on my cast iron and only in extreme sticky oily situations. I'm just saying we should use the common sense and understanding of safe food practices.
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